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Vivid Botanics and Butterflies Encircle Photographer Fares Micue in Striking Self-Portraits

   27 Aug 00:00:23  |  ThisIsColossal

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Tips for finding a professional and experienced painter in Wahroonga for a home improvement project

   26 Aug 11:31:02  |  michaelmodir

Painting a room is not just about the paint colors or textures. It is not a layman’s job to get this hectic job done. It is necessary to look for a professional company that provides a painter in Wahroonga for your project. Once you have found a professional one for your space, you will be able to achieve the desired results. Whether you have a complete home improvement project, or need to renovate a part of your home, it is necessary to look for a good painting and decorating company who can assist you.

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A Dozing Owl and Tussling Hummingbirds Top the 2020 Bird Photographer of the Year Competition

   26 Aug 00:00:17  |  ThisIsColossal

The winning shots from the renowned Bird Photographer of the Year contest capture the mundane moments and extraordinary adventures of our avian neighbors. From a sleepy owl camouflaged by tree bark to a lurching great crested grebe, the stunning birds shown here were chosen out of more than 15,000 entries from photographers around the globe.
The charity organization Birds on the Brink hosted the fifth-annual competition, and profits garnered go directly toward conservation efforts. More

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Textile Artists File Their Nails in Tiny Grooves for Traditional Japanese Weaving Technique

   26 Aug 00:00:17  |  ThisIsColossal

Along with a comb and shuttle, textile artists crafting “tsumekaki hon tsuzure ori,” the intricate and durable brocades that are part of Japanese traditions, employ the jagged tips of their fingernails. Common in the Shiga prefecture, the ancient technique utilizes the weaver’s grooved nails to guide the threads down the loom, ensuring they’re placed tightly together. The “tsuzure ori,” or tapestry weave, has roots in the Muromachi period (1336 to 1573), while this specific method has been in Japan for at least 1,000 years, according to Kiyohara Seiji, a representative of Kiyohara Textile Co., Ltd. More

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Transparent Public Restrooms in Tokyo Transform into Opaque, Colorful Stalls When in Use

   25 Aug 00:00:07  |  ThisIsColossal

On the periphery of a busy city park in Tokyo is a transparent bathroom that offers a few forms of alleviation. Although it seemingly provides little privacy, the translucent facade is designed to let people peer inside to inspect the cleanliness before they venture in. Once users do open the door and step into the structure, the walls turn into opaque, illuminated stalls that hide the person from view. As public bathrooms have shut down and been a source of fear since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, the new structure ameliorates multiple issues of accessibility. More

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Anonymous, Posed Figures by Artist Hanna Lee Joshi Explore the Female Body

   25 Aug 00:00:06  |  ThisIsColossal

The posed women in Hanna Lee Joshi?s latest series are comprised of vivid gradients: their chests are cobalt, shoulders rose, and palms lime. Created with gouache and colored pencil, the bright hues stray from flesh tones in favor of what Joshi terms “a more otherworldly aspect in my women. Reclaiming the goddess within and exploring the concept of embodying an ephemeral spirit in form,” she says. By rendering their enlarged, curved torsos and limbs in bold shades, Joshi subverts the tradition of the nude figure. More

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A Vibrant, Geometric Rug Cascades Down a Staircase in a New Mural by Jessie and Katey

   24 Aug 00:00:23  |  ThisIsColossal

To create the brightly colored textile that cloaks a three-level staircase on the Appalachian State University campus, artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn (previously) imagined the concrete steps as a massive loom. They drew grids on the outdoor structure to map out where each individual strip would start, end, and intersect with the larger geometric forms. “There was a lot of math involved, getting the angles and perspective right was a challenge but eventually everything locked into place,” the Baltimore-based duo, who are known as Jessie and Katey, shares with Colossal. More

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In ?Human,? Artist Beth Cavener Chronicles Nearly Two Decades of Evocative Sculptural Creatures

   24 Aug 00:00:23  |  ThisIsColossal

In the hands of Montana-based sculptor Beth Cavener (previously), clay transforms into mesmerizing, life-size animal figures charged with raw emotion and vitality. ?Human?, her recently released and award-winning monograph, gathers and celebrates nearly two decades of these extraordinary creations, featuring 160 color plates of work from six series. The curious menagerie includes hares, foxes, goats, and other common mammals, with graceful and luminous bodies depicted in situations that are often tinged with a sense of violent tension. More

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Sunlight Filters Through a Shell-Like Pavilion Covered with Wicker Baskets in Annecy, France

   23 Aug 00:00:25  |  ThisIsColossal

A new, woven structure in the Jardins de l’Europe in Annecy, France, offers respite from direct sunlight without completely blocking out the light source. The Wicker Pavilion is comprised of pine planks that are formed into a shell, which is covered with 262 wicker baskets that are hand-woven by Latvian craftsmen. When the sun hits the structure, it casts intricate triangular patterns on the grass inside and nearby, allowing it to merge with the rest of the garden rather than blanket it in a shadow. More

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Hundreds of Collaged Photographs Form Rich, Botanical Worlds by Artist Catherine Nelson

   23 Aug 00:00:26  |  ThisIsColossal

A decade ago, Catherine Nelson compiled hundreds of photographs of barren, snow-covered landscapes and autumnal forests for her project Future Memories 2010. The Australian artist, who lives and works between Ghent and Amsterdam, recently revisited that series to create a new body of work with similar world-building techniques. “With the tumultuous events of 2020 still unfolding and the undeniable links to the destruction of the natural world by mankind, it felt timely to return to the themes from that series, which talk about our planet and the importance of protecting what we have,” she says. More

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